Do you want to report suspicious activity? Are you at risk of human trafficking? Call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline.

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Warning Signs That Someone Is Being Trafficked

Human trafficking is a problem in every state, and in every community.

If you believe that someone is being trafficked or exploited, call the The National Human Trafficking Resource Center to report your suspicions and seek help. All calls are treated anonymously:

1-888-3737-888

Here are some of the warning signs to look out for.

Common Work/Living Conditions

Lack of Control

Abnormal Behavior in Public

Poor Physical Health

Minh Dang
YES, YOU CAN FIGHT SLAVERYBY SELLING MORE STUFF 
"You can’t fight people being sold by selling more stuff."
It’s a criticism I’ve heard a few times of the anti-trafficking movement’s use of ethical consumerism and social enterprise to fight slavery. 
But it’s misguided. 
Sure, nobody is naive enough to assume that selling more organic, sweat shop free t-shirts is suddenly going to force traffickers to end their ways. And yes, there are legitimate questions to be asked about a world where we are quicker to buy an “ethical product” than cast a vote. 
But trafficking victims and survivors need certain things:
1) They need support, therapy and shelter. Lots of it. 
2) They need a platform so their voice can be heard by those in power.
3) They need a realistic path out of exploitation. 
A carefully designed approach to social enterprise and commerce can deliver all of these things. It can raise funds for support networks and for campaigning alike. It can act as a direct platform for engaging more minds. (I can buy a Coke and learn about, well, nothing - or I can buy a bottle of REBBL and become engaged in the issue of modern slavery.)  
Perhaps most importantly, business can provide jobs, training, skills and opportunity for victims, survivors, and vulnerable populations alike to break the cycles of debt and exploitation that keep them in bondage. 
Political debates over the pros and cons of a market-based economy have been raging for centuries. These debates will (and should) continue so we can craft a better, more intelligent future for all of us. 
But in the meantime, people are being exploited in every town and city across the Globe. Let’s not reject ANY tool to improve their lives without first assessing whether it works based on facts - not ideological assumptions. 

YES, YOU CAN FIGHT SLAVERY
BY SELLING MORE STUFF 

"You can’t fight people being sold by selling more stuff."

It’s a criticism I’ve heard a few times of the anti-trafficking movement’s use of ethical consumerism and social enterprise to fight slavery. 

But it’s misguided. 

Sure, nobody is naive enough to assume that selling more organic, sweat shop free t-shirts is suddenly going to force traffickers to end their ways. And yes, there are legitimate questions to be asked about a world where we are quicker to buy an “ethical product” than cast a vote. 

But trafficking victims and survivors need certain things:

1) They need support, therapy and shelter. Lots of it. 

2) They need a platform so their voice can be heard by those in power.

3) They need a realistic path out of exploitation. 

A carefully designed approach to social enterprise and commerce can deliver all of these things. It can raise funds for support networks and for campaigning alike. It can act as a direct platform for engaging more minds. (I can buy a Coke and learn about, well, nothing - or I can buy a bottle of REBBL and become engaged in the issue of modern slavery.)  

Perhaps most importantly, business can provide jobs, training, skills and opportunity for victims, survivors, and vulnerable populations alike to break the cycles of debt and exploitation that keep them in bondage. 

Political debates over the pros and cons of a market-based economy have been raging for centuries. These debates will (and should) continue so we can craft a better, more intelligent future for all of us. 

But in the meantime, people are being exploited in every town and city across the Globe. Let’s not reject ANY tool to improve their lives without first assessing whether it works based on facts - not ideological assumptions. 

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THE AVERAGE VICTIM IS 12 YEARS OLD

At 17, Danielle was forced into prostitution - but she says the average age of girls being forced into sex slavery is just 12.

"It's like being raped over and over and over and over," says Danielle.

Rain is more typical of the average American victim, having entered prostitution at the age of 11.

When asked about the men whom she slept with, she is unequivocal about what they were: child abusers.

"I'm not going to label them Johns," she says.

Take action to support THE CASE ACT.


VICTIMS NOT CRIMINALS

Carissa was 12 years old when she was coerced into prostitution.

"I remember him vividly putting his arm around me and acting like he was my buddy. Within days, he was raping me violently."

With children as young as 11 or 12 being exploited for sex, there is a pressing need to differentiate between pimps and prostitutes. Nearly all prostitutes in the US are victims of child sex trafficking, and activists around the country are pushing for law enforcement to recognize them as victims - while focusing their efforts on the real criminals, the pimps and johns who make this industry possible.

The CASE Act will raise the penalties for human trafficking, forcing sex traffickers to register as sex offenders, and mandating training on human trafficking for law enforcement.

It will also funnel more funds for victim support.

Take action to support THE CASE ACT.


DISABLED CHILDREN TARGETED

When Vicki's 17-year-old daughter went missing, she feared she was dead. When she was found, Vicki discovered that she had been bought and sold for sex.

Vicki's daughter is developmentally disabled, with a mental age of just 11. Targeting of such vulnerable children is a growing trend within the trafficking industry.

Vicki is now helping to push the CASE Act (Californians Against Sexual Exploitation) - a ballot initiative that will raise penalties for trafficking and increase support for survivors.

Take action to support THE CASE ACT.

Don't Sell Bodies was conceived by Jada Pinkett Smith and Overbrook Entertainment. It was designed by The Change Creation and Goroboto.

It is dedicated to the victims and survivors of trafficking, and the heroes who are fighting to eradicate it.

Creative Team:
Jada Pinkett Smith
Chris "CJay" Jordan
Paress Salinas
Sami Grover
Jerry Stifelman
Chelsea Bay Dennis
Rebekah Miel
Tennessee Watson
Rob Biddiscombe