Do you want to report suspicious activity? Are you at risk of human trafficking? Call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline.

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Warning Signs That Someone Is Being Trafficked

Human trafficking is a problem in every state, and in every community.

If you believe that someone is being trafficked or exploited, call the The National Human Trafficking Resource Center to report your suspicions and seek help. All calls are treated anonymously:

1-888-3737-888

Here are some of the warning signs to look out for.

Common Work/Living Conditions

Lack of Control

Abnormal Behavior in Public

Poor Physical Health

Minh Dang
IS THIS THE MOST POWERFUL WEAPONIN THE FIGHT AGAINST TRAFFICKING?
"We’re not your pet project or your frail, delicate, sadface victims, kk.  If you want to hold a funeral for our poor lost virginity, please go ahead."
The above quote comes from an important post on tumblr by Jacobinesque - a trafficking survivor - on what she sees as the failures of the anti-trafficking movement. 
It is a “must read” for anyone interested in building a coherent movement. (Warning: the post contains strong language and stronger opinions. Those offended by either should be forewarned - but they should read it anyway because it is that important.)
In this missive (and follow up posts/discussions with fellow survivor blogger fou-a-lier), she tackles topics worthy of deep reflection.
She takes great issue with grandiose statements that we can “end slavery in our lifetime”, suggesting that it is too entrenched - and that stating it can simply be “done away with” trivializes what survivors have been through. 
On the role of religion in the movement, Jacobinesque contends it should be kept private. Many survivors may not hold the same religious beliefs, and they may feel judged by some of those out to “save them”. Some survivors have even seen religion used by their abusers to justify what was done to them - for these people, careless discussion of religion has potentially harmful psychological consequences. 
And she is particularly hard hitting when it comes to the issue of discussing how survivors should relate to their own pasts:
"Also please let me know when I am ~sad enough~ for you, I need to know when I am a good enough victim and will finally meet your standards of the Saddest Trafficking Survivor (TM).  Please tell me how to respond to my own trauma and what’s appropriate or not.  Thanks!"
Now there will be much for anti-trafficking activists to agree and disagree with - whether they are survivors themselves or not. For my own part, I maintain that “abolishing trafficking” remains both feasible and crucial to aim for - but I would not ever kid myself that it is easy, nor even likely. 
Activism - any activism - requires selling a narrative. If MLK had said “His Dream” was to end segregation, but maintain a world where systemic racism and institutionalized inequality remain pernicious, I doubt many would have signed on.
And yet that is where we find ourselves today. 
So too, we anti-trafficking activists must aim big. But we must never forget to simultaneously focus MASSIVE EFFORTS on mitigating the damage being done today.
While debate will continue, I’ll leave the last words to Jacobinesque’s ally-in-words, fou-a-lier - on what we must all learn to do more, more often, and more effectively.
And that’s listen:
"If what’s bothering you is why she’s reacting so “angrily,” I’ll tell you why: because you all are going ahead and trying to “rescue” human trafficking victims without once asking them what they think they need, what they want, what was actually important to them about their experiences. And when you do, it dehumanizes them, which believe me, we’ve had enough of already. Your savior complex is only harming us."
Photo: Stephen Dann/Creative Commons 

IS THIS THE MOST POWERFUL WEAPON
IN THE FIGHT AGAINST TRAFFICKING?

"We’re not your pet project or your frail, delicate, sadface victims, kk.  If you want to hold a funeral for our poor lost virginity, please go ahead."

The above quote comes from an important post on tumblr by Jacobinesque - a trafficking survivor - on what she sees as the failures of the anti-trafficking movement. 

It is a “must read” for anyone interested in building a coherent movement. (Warning: the post contains strong language and stronger opinions. Those offended by either should be forewarned - but they should read it anyway because it is that important.)

In this missive (and follow up posts/discussions with fellow survivor blogger fou-a-lier), she tackles topics worthy of deep reflection.

She takes great issue with grandiose statements that we can “end slavery in our lifetime”, suggesting that it is too entrenched - and that stating it can simply be “done away with” trivializes what survivors have been through. 

On the role of religion in the movement, Jacobinesque contends it should be kept private. Many survivors may not hold the same religious beliefs, and they may feel judged by some of those out to “save them”. Some survivors have even seen religion used by their abusers to justify what was done to them - for these people, careless discussion of religion has potentially harmful psychological consequences. 

And she is particularly hard hitting when it comes to the issue of discussing how survivors should relate to their own pasts:

"Also please let me know when I am ~sad enough~ for you, I need to know when I am a good enough victim and will finally meet your standards of the Saddest Trafficking Survivor (TM).  Please tell me how to respond to my own trauma and what’s appropriate or not.  Thanks!"

Now there will be much for anti-trafficking activists to agree and disagree with - whether they are survivors themselves or not. For my own part, I maintain that “abolishing trafficking” remains both feasible and crucial to aim for - but I would not ever kid myself that it is easy, nor even likely. 

Activism - any activism - requires selling a narrative. If MLK had said “His Dream” was to end segregation, but maintain a world where systemic racism and institutionalized inequality remain pernicious, I doubt many would have signed on.

And yet that is where we find ourselves today. 

So too, we anti-trafficking activists must aim big. But we must never forget to simultaneously focus MASSIVE EFFORTS on mitigating the damage being done today.

While debate will continue, I’ll leave the last words to Jacobinesque’s ally-in-words, fou-a-lier - on what we must all learn to do more, more often, and more effectively.

And that’s listen:

"If what’s bothering you is why she’s reacting so “angrily,” I’ll tell you why: because you all are going ahead and trying to “rescue” human trafficking victims without once asking them what they think they need, what they want, what was actually important to them about their experiences. And when you do, it dehumanizes them, which believe me, we’ve had enough of already. Your savior complex is only harming us."

Photo: Stephen Dann/Creative Commons 

  1. deathtasteslikechicken reblogged this from rescueeffect
  2. dontsellbodies posted this

THE AVERAGE VICTIM IS 12 YEARS OLD

At 17, Danielle was forced into prostitution - but she says the average age of girls being forced into sex slavery is just 12.

"It's like being raped over and over and over and over," says Danielle.

Rain is more typical of the average American victim, having entered prostitution at the age of 11.

When asked about the men whom she slept with, she is unequivocal about what they were: child abusers.

"I'm not going to label them Johns," she says.

Take action to support THE CASE ACT.


VICTIMS NOT CRIMINALS

Carissa was 12 years old when she was coerced into prostitution.

"I remember him vividly putting his arm around me and acting like he was my buddy. Within days, he was raping me violently."

With children as young as 11 or 12 being exploited for sex, there is a pressing need to differentiate between pimps and prostitutes. Nearly all prostitutes in the US are victims of child sex trafficking, and activists around the country are pushing for law enforcement to recognize them as victims - while focusing their efforts on the real criminals, the pimps and johns who make this industry possible.

The CASE Act will raise the penalties for human trafficking, forcing sex traffickers to register as sex offenders, and mandating training on human trafficking for law enforcement.

It will also funnel more funds for victim support.

Take action to support THE CASE ACT.


DISABLED CHILDREN TARGETED

When Vicki's 17-year-old daughter went missing, she feared she was dead. When she was found, Vicki discovered that she had been bought and sold for sex.

Vicki's daughter is developmentally disabled, with a mental age of just 11. Targeting of such vulnerable children is a growing trend within the trafficking industry.

Vicki is now helping to push the CASE Act (Californians Against Sexual Exploitation) - a ballot initiative that will raise penalties for trafficking and increase support for survivors.

Take action to support THE CASE ACT.

Don't Sell Bodies was conceived by Jada Pinkett Smith and Overbrook Entertainment. It was designed by The Change Creation and Goroboto.

It is dedicated to the victims and survivors of trafficking, and the heroes who are fighting to eradicate it.

Creative Team:
Jada Pinkett Smith
Chris "CJay" Jordan
Paress Salinas
Sami Grover
Jerry Stifelman
Chelsea Bay Dennis
Rebekah Miel
Tennessee Watson
Rob Biddiscombe