Do you want to report suspicious activity? Are you at risk of human trafficking? Call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline.

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Warning Signs That Someone Is Being Trafficked

Human trafficking is a problem in every state, and in every community.

If you believe that someone is being trafficked or exploited, call the The National Human Trafficking Resource Center to report your suspicions and seek help. All calls are treated anonymously:

1-888-3737-888

Here are some of the warning signs to look out for.

Common Work/Living Conditions

Lack of Control

Abnormal Behavior in Public

Poor Physical Health

Minh Dang
ORANGE COUNTY POLICE SHOULD DO MORE TO FIGHT TRAFFICKING
As the FBI’s Operation Cross Country puts pimps and child abusers in its cross hairs, Los Alamitos Patch has a post on a report from Orange County Grand Jury which suggests that the OC police department is not living up to its responsibilities when it comes to fighting trafficking:
"While sex trafficking of young girls is a growing problem in the country, there is limited awareness of the problem among Orange County officials, including those in government, social services and law enforcement, according to a new report from the Orange County Grand Jury.
The report, published Friday, calls upon law enforcement agencies across the county to identify victims better and create a database to track their movement.
“The 2011-2012 Grand Jury is sending a message to law enforcement and governmental agencies that they should more effectively combat this injustice through greater communication and collaboration,” the report states.”
—-
It’s time for Orange County to take a leadership role in fighting trafficking. And its time for California to face up to its reputation as a hot spot for trafficking and child sexual exploitation. 
Pass the CASE (California Against Sexual Exploitation) Act now.

ORANGE COUNTY POLICE SHOULD DO MORE TO FIGHT TRAFFICKING

As the FBI’s Operation Cross Country puts pimps and child abusers in its cross hairs, Los Alamitos Patch has a post on a report from Orange County Grand Jury which suggests that the OC police department is not living up to its responsibilities when it comes to fighting trafficking:

"While sex trafficking of young girls is a growing problem in the country, there is limited awareness of the problem among Orange County officials, including those in government, social services and law enforcement, according to a new report from the Orange County Grand Jury.

The report, published Friday, calls upon law enforcement agencies across the county to identify victims better and create a database to track their movement.

“The 2011-2012 Grand Jury is sending a message to law enforcement and governmental agencies that they should more effectively combat this injustice through greater communication and collaboration,” the report states.”

—-

It’s time for Orange County to take a leadership role in fighting trafficking. And its time for California to face up to its reputation as a hot spot for trafficking and child sexual exploitation. 

Pass the CASE (California Against Sexual Exploitation) Act now.



THE AVERAGE VICTIM IS 12 YEARS OLD

At 17, Danielle was forced into prostitution - but she says the average age of girls being forced into sex slavery is just 12.

"It's like being raped over and over and over and over," says Danielle.

Rain is more typical of the average American victim, having entered prostitution at the age of 11.

When asked about the men whom she slept with, she is unequivocal about what they were: child abusers.

"I'm not going to label them Johns," she says.

Take action to support THE CASE ACT.


VICTIMS NOT CRIMINALS

Carissa was 12 years old when she was coerced into prostitution.

"I remember him vividly putting his arm around me and acting like he was my buddy. Within days, he was raping me violently."

With children as young as 11 or 12 being exploited for sex, there is a pressing need to differentiate between pimps and prostitutes. Nearly all prostitutes in the US are victims of child sex trafficking, and activists around the country are pushing for law enforcement to recognize them as victims - while focusing their efforts on the real criminals, the pimps and johns who make this industry possible.

The CASE Act will raise the penalties for human trafficking, forcing sex traffickers to register as sex offenders, and mandating training on human trafficking for law enforcement.

It will also funnel more funds for victim support.

Take action to support THE CASE ACT.


DISABLED CHILDREN TARGETED

When Vicki's 17-year-old daughter went missing, she feared she was dead. When she was found, Vicki discovered that she had been bought and sold for sex.

Vicki's daughter is developmentally disabled, with a mental age of just 11. Targeting of such vulnerable children is a growing trend within the trafficking industry.

Vicki is now helping to push the CASE Act (Californians Against Sexual Exploitation) - a ballot initiative that will raise penalties for trafficking and increase support for survivors.

Take action to support THE CASE ACT.

Don't Sell Bodies was conceived by Jada Pinkett Smith and Overbrook Entertainment. It was designed by The Change Creation and Goroboto.

It is dedicated to the victims and survivors of trafficking, and the heroes who are fighting to eradicate it.

Creative Team:
Jada Pinkett Smith
Chris "CJay" Jordan
Paress Salinas
Sami Grover
Jerry Stifelman
Chelsea Bay Dennis
Rebekah Miel
Tennessee Watson
Rob Biddiscombe